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easybakedjewoven:

i cant even write with a pencil

jtumblr:

OKAY SO
America used to be referred to as Columbia, named after Christopher Columbus.
Therefore, British Columbia is the name given to the British part of America (ie Columbia), and it was British because Canada was a British colony. So British Columbia means “British America” (but America as a continent, even though the word DOES have very strong ties to the USA).
The Columbia River is what the area is named for, and it goes through both Canada and the US, hence British Columbia is the area of the Columbia river that is in Canada (British territory). The Columbia river is named that because America was Columbia.

OKAY. NEXT PROBLEM.

Colombia vs Columbia.
If my friend is anything to go off of, haha, then people from Colombia are very adamant that they are Colombian and not Columbian. It’s not called Columbia.
BUT
Both names are derived from Christopher Columbus.
So really, they’re basically the same thing.

Except that the name Columbus is from Greek kolumbos (κόλυμβος) so I’m thinking that both are off, since the Us are more like the english “oo” sound. So English made it a U and Spanish made it a O, but both are kinda off from the Greek.

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MORE INFO

In Spanish, Columbia sounds like “coloombia” because that’s how they pronounce the U.
But even though that would have been closer to the transliteration from Greek, both Italian and Spanish use Colombia instead of Columbia.
So why does Italian use Colombo instead of Columbo, when the word in Latin was “Columbe”, for dove?
I don’t think there’s an answer for that one, lol. Some italian guy decided that’s how it was going to be spelled.

and that one guy, hundreds and hundreds of years ago, is the entire reason Colombia is called Colombia and not Columbia, and thus the entire reason why Spanish and Colombian people are butthurt about English-speakers misspelling Colombia as Columbia.

Comment: Colombo was his actual name, regardless of the word’s origins. Italian didn’t come directly from Latin anyway. 

The river Columbia (and thus the province) was actually named after a ship.

oh my god. more layers. YESSS

Okay so his name was Colombo, so the name Colombia is more ‘correct’ in regards to who it’s called after, than america as Columbus.

I was looking at *why* he was called Colombo though, and my friend Julia points out that there wasn’t really standardized spelling back then, so he could have spelled it differently every time he wrote it, for all we know, switching back and forth between letters.

BC is named after Columbia River, which is named after the boat Columbia, but I can’t seem to find why the boat was called Columbia. Was it named so because the area of America was called Columbia (after Columbus) and that’s where the ship was planning on going? Or maybe it was also named after Columbus? Can’t find that info, but it at least seems to make sense to me, which does link it all again anyway.

So if Columbus himself probably spelled the family name differently, and what we have left in the different languages that got standardized is just an effect of that, then really all spellings of columbia or colombia are right.
So to get around that I’d delve again into where the name came from, to find which spelling we should like the best, and look at the etymology again from greek and latin and now we go in lovely circles 

OKAY SO
America used to be referred to as Columbia, named after Christopher Columbus.
Therefore, British Columbia is the name given to the British part of America (ie Columbia), and it was British because Canada was a British colony. So British Columbia means “British America” (but America as a continent, even though the word DOES have very strong ties to the USA).
The Columbia River is what the area is named for, and it goes through both Canada and the US, hence British Columbia is the area of the Columbia river that is in Canada (British territory). The Columbia river is named that because America was Columbia.

OKAY. NEXT PROBLEM.

Colombia vs Columbia.
If my friend is anything to go off of, haha, then people from Colombia are very adamant that they are Colombian and not Columbian. It’s not called Columbia.
BUT
Both names are derived from Christopher Columbus.
So really, they’re basically the same thing.

Except that the name Columbus is from Greek kolumbos (κόλυμβος) so I’m thinking that both are off, since the Us are more like the english “oo” sound. So English made it a U and Spanish made it a O, but both are kinda off from the Greek.

————————

MORE INFO

In Spanish, Columbia sounds like “coloombia” because that’s how they pronounce the U.
But even though that would have been closer to the transliteration from Greek, both Italian and Spanish use Colombia instead of Columbia.
So why does Italian use Colombo instead of Columbo, when the word in Latin was “Columbe”, for dove?
I don’t think there’s an answer for that one, lol. Some italian guy decided that’s how it was going to be spelled.

and that one guy, hundreds and hundreds of years ago, is the entire reason Colombia is called Colombia and not Columbia, and thus the entire reason why Spanish and Colombian people are butthurt about English-speakers misspelling Colombia as Columbia.

Before jerking off : i would literally suck 6 dicks rn
After jerking off : men are gross
beesfromspace:

I cant believe this

beesfromspace:

I cant believe this

vicious-desperation:

bepeu:

no one has a crush on me. i am too strong to be crushed

image

princcess:

The moment of pure panic when accidentally activating Siri in a quiet place

rachelbearenson:

so turns out the guy who discovered uranus originally wanted to name it “george”

just. imagine a planet called George

mercury venus earth jupiter saturn GEORGE

yesysabella:

Flower Power by Sophie Garmand

poniesponiesevrywhere:

Queen of Parasites by cmaggot